Major Depression Induced Endocrine Modulation is a Risk Factor for Low bone Mineral Density in Premenopausal Women

Authors

  • Priyanka Pahari
  • Vinita Ailani
  • Julie Bhattacharya
  • Ritwik Ganguli

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.37506/ijop.v9i1.2608

Keywords:

BMD, Cortisol, Depression, Premenopausal women, Vitamin D, secondary osteoporosis.

Abstract

Background: The significant physiological effects of psychological depression are beginning to be
recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current
evidence for psychological depression-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for osteoporosis,
the mechanisms that may link these conditions, and potential implications for treatment
Osteoporosis is a major public health threat and depression is second most important cause of disability
worldwide in 2020. Several studies have reported an association between depression and low bone mineral
density, but a causal link between these two conditions is disputed.We propose that depression induces early
bone loss in premenopausal women, primarily via specific endocrine mechanisms associated poor lifestyle
habits contributory.
Aim and Objectives: To find the clinical correlation between depression, serum cortisol, vitamin D,
hypothyroidism and BMD in Premenopausal Women.
To find out a new risk factor of secondary osteoporosis in premenopausal women.
Methods: The study group consisted of 80 osteoporotic female patient’s age range between 30-60years.The
state of depression was analyzed by using Ham D scale. BMD and endocrine parameters was measured by
DEXA and chemiluminisence,ELISA. Statistical correlation analyzed by SPSS22software.
Results: A highly significant (P <0.00001) correlation was observedbetween HAM-D score and serum
cortisol. The correlation between HAM-D and BMD was also significant (P <0.05).No significant correlation
was found between BMD and serum cortisol (P? 0.05).The correlation of serum vitamin D with BMD was
far more significant (P<0.00001) compared to the association with TSH (P<0.0001).
Discussion & Conclusion: A high score of depression associated with low vitamin D level or high serum
cortisol and TSH level which is a risk factor for low BMD in premenopausal women to develop secondary
osteoporosis
It can be concluded that Irrespective of the specific causes, subjects with depression should be considered
for screening for bone mineral density and, vice versa, subjects with low BMD should be considered for
screening for depression in early stage of life and supplementation of vitamin D with regular physical
activity in premenopausal women for prevention of secondary osteoporosis.

Author Biographies

Priyanka Pahari

Assistant Professor of KPCMCH, Kolkata & PhD Scholar of NIMS University, Jaipur

Vinita Ailani

Professer of Physiology
Department, National Institute of Medical Sciences & Research University, Jaipur.

Julie Bhattacharya

Professer of Physiology
Department, National Institute of Medical Sciences & Research University, Jaipur

Ritwik Ganguli

Associate Professor of
Orthopaedics Department [MBBS, MS (orth.), DNB (orth.), Fellowship in Arthroscopy & Sports Medicine (Japan)

Published

2021-02-02

How to Cite

Pahari, P. ., Ailani, V. ., Bhattacharya, J. ., & Ganguli, R. . (2021). Major Depression Induced Endocrine Modulation is a Risk Factor for Low bone Mineral Density in Premenopausal Women. International Journal of Physiology, 9(1), 30-35. https://doi.org/10.37506/ijop.v9i1.2608